Typed Letter Signed by Scottish Television Pioneer and Inventory John L. Baird: “With regard to obtaining a permit, I suggest that you write to the B.B.C.”

Signed by John Logie Baird

$750
Item: 19298
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BAIRD, JOHN LOGIE. (1888-1946). Scottish inventor; produced first televised picture of a moving object in 1926 and in 1928 developed color television. TLS. (“J.L. Baird”). ½p. 4to. London, October 29, 1936. On Baird Television Limited letterhead. To Secretary of the Yorkshire Television Association.

In reply to your letter of the 23rd October with regard to obtaining a permit, I suggest that you write to the B.B.C. for this, addressing your letter to Mr. Gerald Cock. Yours faithfully…”

Baird was an inventor with diverse interests who, early in his career, dabbled in such diverse areas as synthetic diamonds, a glass razor, pneumatic shoes, thermal “undersocks,” fiber optics, radar, and video recording. His major contribution to science, however, came with his pioneering television transmission in 1925. His demonstration was repeated for the Royal Society the following year and, in 1927, he transmitted the first long-distance television images between London and Glasgow. In 1928, he again made history by transmitting the first televised images broadcast in color. Baird International Television Limited was formed in 1928 to explore the commercial applications of his innovations, and, beginning in 1929, the BBC transmitted television programming using one of Baird’s systems. Baird’s commercial endeavor was hindered by the total loss of his Crystal Palace laboratory in 1936, and, by 1937, the BBC switched its transmissions to the competing Marconi system. Nonetheless, Baird continued to make important innovations in television broadcasting up until his death.

Gerald Cock (1887-1973) was an executive at BBC Radio before becoming the first director of television at BBC Television in 1935. “At the time many BBC executives were skeptical about the value and potential of the new medium, and Cock’s achievement during his shirt reign – the pre-World War II service began in November 1936 and was closed in September 1939 – was to push for the expansion of the television service in the face of the BBC’s reluctance to fund adequately what became known as the ‘Cinderella Service.’ Unlike many senior BBC executives, Cock regarded television as a natural successor to radio, rather than as a luxury or novelty… Despite few staff and two small studios, Cock was able to build up an effective and successful repertoire of program achievements – including the live televising of the coronation of George VI, tennis from Wimbledon and even a program where Cock himself answered viewers’ phone-in questions. In fact, every type of program that was to become popular after the war was already attempted during these prewar years, in part because of the freedom to experiments that Cock was allowed by his producers,” (Encyclopedia of Television, Newcomb).

With two file holes in the left margin. Gently folded into quarters with normal wear and in very good condition.

Typed Letter Signed by Scottish Television Pioneer and Inventory John L. Baird: “With regard to obtaining a permit, I suggest that you write to the B.B.C.”

Signed by John Logie Baird

$750 • item #19298


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