German Abstract Artist and Art Theorist Writes: “These pictures – I believe – are trying to do something new with graphics”

Signed by Josef Albers

$500
Item: 20595
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Albers, Josef. (1888-1976). German abstract artist and art theorist; known for his series, “Homage to the Square.” ALS. (“Albers”). 1p. 4to. Black Mountain, March 9, 1942. To Mr. Zigooner [?].

Albers Sanctuary from his Graphic Tectonic series, 1942, MoMA

 

In case you go to New York during this or next week I should like very much you to see 4 of my new lithos now at the exhibition of the AAA (American Abstract Artists) at the Amer. Fine Arts Gallery 210 W. 57.

The[y] are from a series of 8 lithos “Graphic Tectonic” in which I have tried to develop from only Horizontals and Verticals (the most unspacial elements) illusions of space and volume with multiple images. I only wish that you see them. You have no other risk. I even don’t ask you to write me. I ask you because these pictures – I believe – are trying to do something new with graphics…” yours…”

Albers joined the Bauhaus in 1920 and worked in such diverse media as glass, metal and paint in areas ranging from furniture design to typography. After the Nazis shut down the school in 1933, he immigrated to the U.S. accepting a position at the avant-garde Black Mountain College. There his pupils included such notable artists as Robert Motherwell, Ray Johnson and Robert Rauschenberg. In 1942, Albers created his Graphic Tectonics series of zinc plate lithographs in which he explored the absence of color, optical illusion and creating what he described as the “maximum effect from minimum means.” Albers later headed Yale’s department of design and continued to exert his influence over the art world long after his retirement in 1958.

Founded in 1936 in New York City, American Abstract Artists promoted this new art form, something viewed by both institutions and the public as largely a European art form. The organization was especially influential during the 1940s and ‘50s when Abstract Expressionism dominated the American avant-garde art scene.

Written in Albers’ careful hand on a blank sheet of paper. Folded with some creasing, wear, and light toning, especially along the right edge; in fine condition. Uncommon this early and with art-related content.

German Abstract Artist and Art Theorist Writes: “These pictures – I believe – are trying to do something new with graphics”

Signed by Josef Albers

$500 • item #20595


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